Adams, Hammons, and Related Families Genealogy

Notes


Mrs Hannah Cochran

1850 Census, Savana River Regiment, Abbeville, South Carolina, Pg 53
Hannah Cochran 89 F PA
Eleanor 60 F NC

Living next to William Means


Icyphene Davis

1880 Census Place: Precinct 4, Erath, Texas
Source: FHL Film 1255302 National Archives Film T9-1302 Page 80C
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Icyphena REEDER Self F W W 63 IL
Occ: Keeping House Fa: KY Mo: KY
Queen V. REEDER Dau F S W 22 TX
Fa: KY Mo: IL


Albert Reeder

1880 Census Place: Precinct 4, Erath, Texas
Source: FHL Film 1255302 National Archives Film T9-1302 Page 80C
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Albert H. REEDER Self M M W 25 KS
Occ: Farming Fa: AR Mo: AR
Martha J. REEDER Wife F M W 22 MS
Occ: Keeping House Fa: --- Mo: AL
Robert M. REEDER Son M S W 5 TX
Fa: KS Mo: MS
Henry G. REEDER Son M S W 2 TX
Fa: KS Mo: MS
Joseph R. REEDER Son M S W 4M TX
Fa: KS Mo: MS
Louisa J. ANDRESS SisterL F W 19 MS
Fa: AL Mo: AL


1880 Census Place: Precinct 4, Erath, Texas
Source: FHL Film 1255302 National Archives Film T9-1302 Page 80C
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Albert G. REEDER Self M M W 46 AR
Occ: Farming Fa: KY Mo: ILL
Nancy C. REEDER Wife F M W 47 AR
Occ: Keeping House Fa: AL Mo: AL
John G. REEDER Son M S W 18 AR
Occ: Works On Farm Fa: AR Mo: AR
Edward F. REEDER Son M S W 11 MO
Occ: Works On Farm Fa: AR Mo: AR
Dora R. REEDER Dau F S W 8 KS
Occ: At School Fa: AR Mo: AR
Ella G. REEDER Dau F S W 1 TX
Fa: AR Mo: AR


Alhambra Davis Reeder

1880 Census Place: Precinct 4, Erath, Texas
Source: FHL Film 1255302 National Archives Film T9-1302 Page 80C
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Alhambra D. REEDER Self M M W 26 AR
Occ: Farming Fa: KY Mo: AR
Angeline REEDER Wife F M W 25 TX
Occ: Keeping House Fa: --- Mo: ---
Micaiah REEDER Son M S W 10 TX
Fa: AR Mo: TX
Hanna E. REEDER Dau F S W 8 TX
Fa: AR Mo: TX
David REEDER Son M S W 7 TX
Fa: AR Mo: TX
Sarah I. REEDER Dau F S W 5 TX
Fa: AR Mo: TX
Aaron REEDER Son M S W 1 TX
Fa: AR Mo: TX


John Adams

I do not have proof that John is the father of Francis, but everything seems to fit, and any help would be appreciated.

John Moved to Jefferson Co. from York Co. in the early 1820's

1800 Census York Co. South Carolina
John Adams 20010 00010

1810 Census York Co., South Carolina
John Adams 02010 20010
Elias Rofs
Alex Martin
John chambers 22010 40010
Wm Adams 10010 21010

1830 Census Jefferson Co. Alabama
John Adams
Ages Male Female
<5 0 0
5-10 0 0
10-15 0 1
15-20 0 1
20-30 1 0
30-40 0 0
40-50 0 0
50-60 1 1

This would indicate that there are at least 2 More daughter and another son than what is listed.


John Adams

There is a John Adams that married a Rachel Donald in Jefferson Co. on 14 Jan 1827 ????

There is also a John Adams that married Francis Adams Wifes sister in 1838 in Greene Co. Alabama ????


Francis Adams

1800 Census York Co. South Carolina
Francis Adams 1male >45, and 1 Female > 45

1820 Census York Co, Alabama
Francis Adams 000001 000010
Listed next to William


Francis Adams

FAMILY NAMED ADAMS

Compiled in 1997 by James F. Adams. son of Lee E. Adams and grandson of James Richard Adams.

Excerpts copied from a book titled Scotch-Irish Migration To South Carolina. Available at the Dallas Main Public Library, Genealogy Section.

About 1768 Lord Donegail, the absentee landlord in Ballymoney, County Antrim, Northern Ireland raised the rents to such an extent that even under normal conditions few persons were able to pay without in time exhausting their resources. By 1772 the situation was acute, although those who were employed in the linen industry still had some possessions. These were. however, rapidly being reduced by the necessity of giving aid to their relatives on the farm.

Early in 1772 the landlord's agent came to a man's home. according to tradition, to collect the rent. (It was probably to dispossess them for failure to pay the rent.) It so happened that his wife was at a critical stage in having her first child and he was so concerned about her condition he could not be bothered and took the bailiff by the neck and threw him out of the house. Unfortunately, the man landed on his head and broke his neck. The wife and baby died and the husband could not be found.

The following Sunday, the minister of the Covenanter Presbyterian Congregation in the area, the Rev. William Martin, preached a sermon on the situation. He stated that every person who knew anything about the country knew the rents were so high that the land would not bring in enough to pay them, that human nature being what it was he realized that more and more incidents of the kind that had occurred that week would again occur, but as a minister he could not stand idly by and await the violence and ruin that would come. Steps should be taken "now" to see that such situations did not develop. Therefore, he proposed that the congregation pool its resources, that they send to Belfast and charter ships, and the entire congregation, under his leadership, emigrate to South Carolina, where they could get free land and live as free men. The congregation, having nothing to lose by it, agreed.

Four or five ships were needed. They sailed from Belfast, Larne and other nearby ports. All were supposed to sail within a few days of each other, but after the first one sailed the others were delayed and then ran into storms. So when the first ship arrived in Charles Town late in October it was first held because of sickness on board and when the passengers finally went ashore they found Rev. William Martin had not arrived and no one knew anything about arrangements for land for them. They had to wait nearly two months until he got there and by that time those who had money had used it up.

Finally the other vessels arrived, all within three days. The South Carolina Gazette dated 24 December 1772, reported, among others, the following "Arrivals at Charles Town"------
Dec. 19 Ship Pennsylvania Farmer Charles Robeson Belfast
..................
Dec. 20 Ship Lord Dunluce James Gillies Larne
..................
Dec. 22 Ship Hopewell John Martin Belfast
Brigt. Free Mason John Semple Newry
In the same issue appeared a news item:
"On Saturday last .............
"The same day arrived the Pennsylvania Farmer, Captain Robeson, from Belfast; Sunday, the Lord Dunluce, Captain Gillies, from Larne; on Tuesday the Hopewell, Captain Martin, from Belfast; and the Freemason, Captain Semple, from Newry; all with Irish passengers, above 1000 souls"
The passengers on the Lord Dunluce also wrote a letter of commendation for the ship and Captain, which appeared in the Belfast Newsletter 4-8 June 1773.
Charles Town, 15 January 1773
For the Belfast News Letter.
We, the undernamed Subscribers, think it is a duty incumbent upon us to acquaint the Publick in general and our Friends in particular, that we went on board from Larne the Ship Lord Dunluce, a stout commodious Vessel, James Gillis, Master; and after eleven Weeks Passage we arrived at Charles Town in South Carolina (our passage being prolonged by contrary Winds, which beat us so far North, and continuing to blow from the South West, detained us near three Weeks out of our way, notwithstanding all the Care and unwearied Diligence of our Captain, who did not fail to take all safe Advantage, in order to expedite our Way). But the Tediousness of our Voyage was rendered as agreeable to us as possible by the humane treatment of our worthy Captain , and agreeable Company, together with the useful and timely Admonitions of our respected Friend, the Revd. William Martin, who never failed when the Weather and Time would permit, to preach the everlasting gospel to us, the which we esteemed a singular Blessing. We had Plenty of Provisions of good Quality, and so would have had as agreeable a Passage, notwithstanding the Length of it, as any that ever was made from Ireland, had it not happened that a Small-pox broke out in the Vessel, which continued for some Time, and occasioned the Death of some Children; during which Time our Worthy Captain, and the Revd. Mr. Martin were duly employed visiting the Sick, and administering Cordials to their several Necessities, etc. which Disorders would have caused us (according to the Laws of the Land) to have road Quarantine six weeks, had not our Captain, by his Application to a Friend of his, through whose kind Mediation we obtained Liberty to go ashore the day before the grand Court met, and got the Favour of being called up to get out Warrants before those that had landed before with riding fifteen Days Quarantine, which was a Favour that not many have been favoured with. Again, our worthy Friend Captain Gillis and Mr. Martin did not cease, at the Expiration of our Voyage, to continue their fatherly Care over us, but used their utmost Endeavors to obtain money to carry us to our Plantations, etc. Therefore, we invite all our friends that intend to come to this land, to sail with Captain Gillis if possible, as he is both a solid, cautious, and careful Captain as ever sailed in the passenger Way; the which Opinion we were confirmed in by meeting with some Passengers who landed near the same Time, and hearing of their Treatment, concluded that we would rather pay Capt. Gillis something extraordinary, than sail with any other.

John Huey Abraham Thomson
Samuel Miller Robert Hanna
Wm. Fairies Charles Burnit
Charles Miller John Roarke
John Craig John McQuillen
Wm. Humphrey George Cherry
Archibald McWilliams Thomas Weir
James Crawford David McQuestin
John Flemming James McQuestin
Richard Wright Wm. Barlow
James Sloan Samuel Fear
Francis Adams Gilbert Menary
Wm. Adams James McLurkin
Wm. Miller Richard McLurken
Samuel Barber Widow Mebin
Hugh Owens Thomas McClurken
Wm. Greg James Blair
John Greg Brice Blair
James Brown Thomas Wilson
John Agnew David Murray & Family
David Montgomery John McClenaghan
John Baird Archibald McNeel
Alexander Fleming James Wilson
Matthew Fleming Robert Jameson
Wm. Crawford John Henring
Robert Reed

The Lord Dunluce with Rev. William Martin aboard arrived about two months after the first ship landed and by that time those who had money had used it up. But soon after he arrived he arranged for their land. However, to their great disappointment, it was not all in one tract, or even adjoining tracts, as they had expected but had to be in individual tracts, scattered all over the colony.
Index in this book listing legal documents concerning the passengers from these ships:
11. Francis Adams.
(b) 350 acres P.F. 7; Jan. 1773; in Craven Co., on branches of Rum Creek;
bd'd James McHughes, vacant land; cer. 16 March 1773
(c) York County
(d) Testator. York Co. Wills, vol. 2, p. 170; Francis Adams, 2 Sept. 1824, pr. 20 July 1825; Dau. Martha Byers; sons, William, Francis, John (if he comes to this country). Ex., one was Williamson Byers.

Notes from Leonardo Andrea's South Carolina Genealogical Collection regarding Francis Adams, born ca 1740 in Ireland:

Item #31 Council Journal dated 6 Jan. 1773
Lately arrived from Ireland on the ship Lord Dunluce and asked for lands.
Francis Adams & 350 acres of land. Married & 5 children under 16
William Adams & 150 acres of land. Married & l child under 16.
Rachel Adams & 100 acres of land, single.
Rachel Adams & 100 acres of land, single.
John Adams & 100 acres of land, single.
Mary Adams & 100 acres of land, single.
Each adult was entitled to 100 acres of land and children under 16 received 50 acres each. Maybe the two Rachels were Francis Adams' wife and daughter?
Item #31 continued.
David Montgomery & 350 acres of land. Married & 5 children under 16.
Hugh Montgomery & 100 acres of land, single
Hugh was the son of David Montgomery . Note in #2 that James Adams named his first son David Adams and I wonder if David Montgomery who came on same ship with these Adamses - land Waxhaw?

Francis Adams settled in York County and spent the rest of his life there. When he first arrived the area was known as the Waxhaws of the Camden District. Waxhaw was the name of an Indian Tribe that lived there.

·Item #34 Francis Adams in #31 was a prominent man and had a large family. He settled in the Waxhaw area where there was already several families of Adams and Montgomery residing. Francis Adams soon after he landed was appointed as Deputy Surveyor of Lands for the Crown.

Some official documents listed the title Esquire after Francis Adams' name. In English law Esquire was a title of dignity next above gentlemen and below knight. Also, a title of office given to sheriffs, serjeants and barristers at law, justice of the peace, and others.


Item #226 Francis Adams, York County, a will ag. 2 Sept. 1824 pr. 30 July 1825. No wife is listed. Evidently all of the children are not named. These are named:
Martha Byers, Francis Adams, William Adams, John Adams. My son John will have my hat if he will come to this country to get it, if he does not come, then my hat will go to Williamson Byers. Simpson Adams, my grandson, will have all my clothing. (John Adams was living in America so he probably meant to say county instead of country.)


Francis Adams

Notes from Leonardo Andrea's South Carolina Genealogical Collection regarding Francis Adams, born November 24, 1763 in Ireland:

Item #40 Land Plats for service in the Revolutionary War. The number after the name indicates how many plats. Francis Adams 1

Item #235 Francis Adams. Jr. -- Revolutionary Pension #W5198 and Land Grant BLWT#29034-160-55.
He was born 24 Nov. 1763 in Ireland. He died 12 Sept. 1846 in Macon, Noxubee Co., Miss. He enlisted for service in the Waxhaw settlement where he was residing in what is now York County and enlisted about 1 July 1778 and was discharged in Nov. l781. (Note he was only 15 years old when he enlisted.) His service was as a private and he served under Captains Henry Coffee, Marshall Jones, John Montgomery and under Cols. Bratton and John Marshall. He took part in the siege of Charleston, the storming of Buckhead Fort, the battles of Rocky Mount, Black River, Wright's Bluff, Fourholes and Granby Fort. The veteran was allowed a pension under Act of June 7, l832 and it was paid from the Georgia Agency but later transferred to the Mississippi Agency. His widow, Mary Adams, was also pensioned and her pension was paid from the Little Rock, Ark. Agency. Warrant #29034 for 160 acres of Bounty Land under Act of March 3, l855 was issued to Mary Adams, widow of Francis Adams, on account of his Revolutionary Service --- Mary Adams the widow of Francis Adams, declared July 22, 1853 that she was then aged 68 years and was residing in Union County, Ark. where she had removed after the death of her husband. In 1855 she was residing in El Dorado, Ark. and in 1859 she was residing at Lisbon, Union Co., Ark. Francis Adams was married 27 Nov. 1817 in Lancaster Co., S.C. to Mrs. Mary Ryan, widow and the daughter of William Farrell. There is no date as to the children.----The marriage certificate presented in connection with the pension application, listed Francis Adams as Captain Francis Adams, married in Lancaster Co., S.C. at the Waxhaws, on the 27th day of Nov., 1817 to the widow, Mrs. Mary Ryan the daughter of William Farrell. Francis Adams when he applied for his pension, stated he was residing in the 2nd District of Henry County, Georgia where he had removed some years previously from Lancaster Dist., S.C. In 1843 he was residing at Macon, Noxubee Co., Miss. where he died.

Item#235a I suspect that Mrs. Mary Ryan was the second wife of Francis Adams, Jr.. He was aged 54 years when he married her.

THE LAST WILL & TESTAMENT OF FRANCIS ADAMS, Jr.

I Francis Adams sign of Noxubee County Mississippi so this day the fourteenth of December in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty Four do hereby make my last Will and Testament in mind and form following that is to say:
1st I desire my wife Mary Adams to have my household and kitchen furnishings and all my stock of horses, cattle and hogs and my Negro girl June to be my wife's until married or her deceased and then said Negro girl June and her increase to be equally divided between Franklin M. Adams, John Q. Adams and Mary Z.C. Adams, but if Franklin M. Adams should be successful and get the Negro woman Cely and her increase that I gave him a deed of gift sometime hence then in that case he shall not be entitled to any part of the Negro girl June and her increase and one Negro buoy Edward formerly possession of James Rodgers of this county I do give to John Rodgers son of James Rodgers and Negro buoy Henry formerly in possession of James Rodgers I do give to Jane Adams a daughter of Francis Adams June and the rest of the increase that is not named in this instrument of the Negro woman Ann formerly in possession of James Rodgers of this county I give to my three children to be equally divided among them that is to say Franklin M. Adams, John Q. Adams and Mary Z. C. Adams and lastly I do hereby constitute and appoint my son Franklin M. Adams and my friend Jethro Atkins Executors of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking all other former Wills and Testaments by me heretofore made.
In witness whereof I have here unto my hand and affixed my seal this in presence of us:
T. H. Matthews
John T. Reat Francis Adams


Samuel Adams

Adams, Samuel
Father: Adams, Francis Mother: Kee, Margaret Mc
Birth Date: 1787 City: Kernshaw Dist
County: Camden State: SC
Country: USA


William Adams

Adams, William

Father: Adams, Francis Mother: Kee, Margaret Mc
Birth Date: 1789 City: Kernshaw Dist
County: Camden State: SC
Country: USA


John Adams

Adams, John
Father: Adams, Francis Mother: Kee, Margaret Mc
Birth Date: 1796 City: Kernshaw Dist
County: Camden State: SC
Country: USA


Peggy McQueen Adams

Adams, Peggy Mcqueen

Father: Adams, Francis Mother: Kee, Margaret Mc
Birth Date: 1798 City: Kernshaw Dist
County: Camden State: SC
Country: USA


Franklin Adams

Adams, Franklin

Father: Adams, Francis Mother: Kee, Margaret Mc
Birth Date: 1800 City: Kernshaw Dist
County: Camden State: SC
Country: USA


Earl Adams

Adams, Earl

Father: Adams, Francis Mother: Kee, Margaret Mc
Birth Date: 1801 City: Kernshaw Dist
County: Camden State: SC
Country: USA